Inclusion

Inclusion means that people with disabilities (special educational needs or specific learning difficulties) are entitled to the same access to the primary curriculum as people without them. In this section, you will find resources useful for improving inclusion across the primary history curriculum.

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  • History and identity

    Article

    A sense of identity is at the heart of the proposed new NC for History. Sir Keith explores what this means for immigrant children of mixed heritage who grew up in Britain. Significantly, the last sentence of his paper dovetails with the government's views...

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  • OFSTED, primary history and creativity

    Article

    Co-ordinators concerns: OFSTED, primary history and creativity I'm told the emphasis in schools now is for a rigorous approach to history where the children are taught the main facts and features of history. I recall a time not so long ago when the whole curriculum was about creativity but surely...

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  • Differentiation: Gifted and Talented

    Article

    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. Gifted and talented (G&T) education has a major focus upon differentiation: the identification and support of pupils who have the abilities to perform at the highest levels. The Autumn 2007 edition of Primary History 47 focused upon...

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  • Whose history is it anyway?

    Article

    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. The main goals of educating children are meeting their educational and achievement needs. Herein is the challenge. Our classrooms are a cornucopia of diversity. The most prominent or acknowledged being gender, class, religion and ethnicity. Some...

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  • Dimensions Of Britishness: Cultural Diversity and Ethnicity

    Article

    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. Teaching history is a balancing act between generalities and the particular. This article seeks to explore how Britishness and ethnic diversity relate to a broader understanding of diversity. We do not challenge the teaching of topics...

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  • Case Study: Working with gifted and talented children at an Iron Age hill fort in north Somerset

    Article

    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. The phone call was over - manna from heaven. The opportunity to work with a ‘real' archaeologist on a ‘real' Iron Age site seemed far too good to be true. The cluster of eight South...

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  • Getting Started: The identification of gifted historians

    Article

    The complexity of identification Crucial to personalised learning, entitlement and opportunity for equality is the identification of outstanding gifts and talents in children. The quest to identify gifted young historians is challenging as these pupils can be found in so many guises. Like all Gifted and Talented pupils they are...

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  • Ways of making Key Stage 2 history culturally inclusive: A study of practice developed in Kirklees

    Article

    Kirklees, West Yorkshire comprises Huddersfield, Dewsbury and Batley. There is a population of 300,000. Minority, ethnic pupils account for nearly 20%. Over the next decade it is predicted that there will be an increase in the number of pupils of Pakistani, Indian, African, African Caribbean and Chinese descent entering the...

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