Inclusion

Inclusion means that people with disabilities (special educational needs or specific learning difficulties) are entitled to the same access to the primary curriculum as people without them. In this section, you will find resources useful for improving inclusion across the primary history curriculum.

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  • Assessment and Progression without levels

    Article

    The new (2014) Primary History National Curriculum is finally upon us. The first thing you might notice is that the level descriptions have gone. These were first introduced in 1995 and became the mainstay for assessing pupil progression and attainment in Key Stages 1, 2 and 3 across schools in...

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  • Case Study: Working with gifted and talented children at an Iron Age hill fort in north Somerset

    Article

    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. The phone call was over - manna from heaven. The opportunity to work with a ‘real' archaeologist on a ‘real' Iron Age site seemed far too good to be true. The cluster of eight South...

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  • Differentiation: Gifted and Talented

    Article

    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. Gifted and talented (G&T) education has a major focus upon differentiation: the identification and support of pupils who have the abilities to perform at the highest levels. The Autumn 2007 edition of Primary History 47 focused upon...

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  • Dimensions Of Britishness: Cultural Diversity and Ethnicity

    Article

    Please note: this article pre-dates the 2014 National Curriculum and some content may be outdated. Teaching history is a balancing act between generalities and the particular. This article seeks to explore how Britishness and ethnic diversity relate to a broader understanding of diversity. We do not challenge the teaching of topics...

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  • Diversity and the History Curriculum

    Article

    It's very dangerous if you make it seem like history is the province of a certain segment of society. History should belong to and include all of us. The curriculum needs to appeal to as many children as possible or a number of them could become disenchanted with education because they...

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  • Education White Paper and SEND Review 2022

    31st March 2022

    At the end of March the Department for Education published both an education white paper and a green paper and consultation stemming from the long awaited SEND review, first commissioned in 2019.   Among other things, the white paper outlined a further drive towards the formation of larger multi academy trusts...

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  • Exploring empire, artefacts and local history

    Article

    This article introduces us to the Colonial Countryside Project. Many of the sites we visit, especially the great country houses and stately homes, have long been visited by children. They are often fascinated by both the buildings and the history associated with them. However, there is a growing recognition that...

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  • Film: Exploring representations and attitudes to disability across history

    Article

    This webinar was presented by Richard Rieser, who is a campaigner and champion for disability rights and the coordinator of UK Disability History Month. His presentation is part of our ongoing work to explore disability history and the arguments and representations of it and ensure that people from disability groups...

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  • Getting Started: The identification of gifted historians

    Article

    The complexity of identification Crucial to personalised learning, entitlement and opportunity for equality is the identification of outstanding gifts and talents in children. The quest to identify gifted young historians is challenging as these pupils can be found in so many guises. Like all Gifted and Talented pupils they are...

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  • History and identity

    Article

    A sense of identity is at the heart of the proposed new NC for History. Sir Keith explores what this means for immigrant children of mixed heritage who grew up in Britain. Significantly, the last sentence of his paper dovetails with the government's views...

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  • Ideas for assemblies: LGBT History Month

    Article

    LGBT History Month was established in 2004. It not only raises awareness of discrimination still faced by the LGBT+ community but also celebrates LGBT+ people and their achievements. February is LGBT History Month and its theme this year was ‘History: Peace, Reconciliation, and Activism’. 

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  • Ideas for assemblies: significant women in history

    Article

    For this edition we have chosen an overarching theme of significant women in history to link your assemblies. We have also looked for a link between the women to the month in which your assembly is being delivered. A common approach when introducing each of the women could be to...

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  • Including the Muslim Contribution in the National Curriculum for History

    Article

    History education has a key role to play in creating the informed, critical attachment of young people to the nation and in creating the feeling that young people belong and can participate in national life. The Curriculum for Cohesion Team, comprising Muslim and non-Muslim academics and community leaders, believes that...

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  • Inclusion, diversity and the national curriculum: Are things better than they were?

    Article

    Introduction - the role of history It is an interesting question as to whether history teaching has developed a greater understanding of inclusion and diversity since the start of the National Curriculum. The first version of the National Curriculum required teachers to consider a balance of political, economic, social and...

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  • KS1: Teaching about significant individuals

    Article

    Teaching about significant individuals at Key Stage 1. Workshop by Professor Penelope Hartnett, University of the West of England The history programme of study for Key Stage 1 requires pupils to be taught about: The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements, some...

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  • Migration to Britain through time

    Article

    Migration is rarely absent from the news and arouses political, social cultural and emotional responses which range from compassion to hostility, racism and anti-racism. By exploring migration in the past, it is possible for children to go beyond current issues and appreciate that, rather than being a recent characteristic of...

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  • Muslim soldiers in World War I

    Article

    The objective of this lesson plan was to enable pupils to develop a greater understanding and appreciation of the input of Muslim soldiers in World War I and to do so through empathy and creative discussion. I very much enjoyed teaching this session with a group of Year 6s, all...

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  • OFSTED, primary history and creativity

    Article

    Co-ordinators concerns: OFSTED, primary history and creativity I'm told the emphasis in schools now is for a rigorous approach to history where the children are taught the main facts and features of history. I recall a time not so long ago when the whole curriculum was about creativity but surely...

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  • Primary History Summer Resource 2019: Diversity

    Article

    This free summer resource for primary members is designed to help primary subject leaders and teachers consider the implications of developing a school policy for teaching of diversity in history. This comprehensive guide provides timely advice and considers questions associated with teaching diversity and provides a rationale for its essential role in providing an understanding...

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  • Re-evaluating the role of statues

    Article

    Like them or loathe them, statues are excellent learning resources and the recent events in Bristol and elsewhere should not dissuade us from using them to aid children’s historical knowledge and enquiry skills. In fact, in the current climate, statues need a careful re-evaluation of their role within our towns....

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